Welcome to my Metazoic site! This site discusses the existence of the creatures to come along after humans will be extinct. I first became interested in a world after man when I acquired my first copy of Dougal Dixon's After Man: A Zoology of the Future in 1992. However, I unwittingly created creatures that did not exist from the time I was about 8 years old. But it was after I obtained a copy of that book (now a collector's item) that I decided to take these same creatures I created as a child and make them more realistic in an evolutionary sense. Though it may be hard for a lot of us to grasp, humans will soon become extinct. One of the biggest factors of how this will happen is the current overpopulation rate. Which is why I don't contribute to the population. I created this world with little more than mammals fulfilling all ecological niches with the help of some friends. I even gave the era of the age after man a name, I called it the Metazoic, derived from the words for "After-era" (Meta, meaning after, and zoic meaning era). We are now in the Cenozoic era. To view all the animals I have created since I began this project, you can go to the "Meet the Mammals" section of this site. To discuss your own ideas about what you think will happen in the future world, and share your ideas with others, please feel free to leave a comment.
One more thing, some of you may find this site quite offensive, and you have a right to your own opinion. But please respect my right to have an opinion too. I'm not saying there is no GOD, I believe it was HIM who got the ball rolling. But I believe after that, evolution took over. There is so much more evidence of evolution than there is of creation. Even that going on right under our noses. Other than that, enjoy yourself and visit our many links.

Wednesday, January 7, 2009

New Family Posted: Earless Sea Monkeys

I have posted another family, the highly-advanced earless sea-monkeys. They evolved along the same ways that modern phocids did. There are going to be 2 groups of sea monkeys, there is an earless variety, and an eared variety. The earless are the more advanced species that most of them use sonar to locate prey. Though not all develop this ability. The differences between the eared sea monkeys and the earless are more than obvious. Eared sea monkeys have external ears, a short, diamond-shaped tail and none of their species have the ability to use sonar to detect prey or each other. Earless sea monkeys have no external ears. The closest is with the species Hyphydronexus, which has fleshy flaps that cover the ear openings. The tail is eel-like and sways from side to side, and the rear flippers are greatly reduced and more or less useless. In the eared sea monkeys, the flippers are all the same size and all used for paddling through the water.

Unlike dolphins, these sea monkeys occasionally come to land to relax and take to water to hunt and mate. Anyway, here is the link: http://www.metazoica.com/earless.html. Also I am working with someone who wants to do cladograms for my site. I always wanted to do something like that but I am not that great. This person knows how to do them and even sent a sample. So I am letting him do them.

7 comments:

Pavel I. Volkov said...

Cassandra, just try to estimate... Can we call these creatures "monkeys". Of course, we KNOW they are descendants of primates (I keep silence, keep silence, keep silence...). But imagine their discovery. First we see and name them, and only second we recognize their systematic position. I think their name is not so good for such animals.

Timgal said...

Well, it'll do until I can think of a better one.

Pavel I. Volkov said...

I propose the name "Lutrodelphiformes" for this group. It means "otter dolphins" and emphasizes the otter features in dolphin-like animals. Also names like "Paracetacea", "Pseudocetacea" or even "Enantioceti" ("not true whales") may be used.

Timgal said...

Well, I kinda want to keep the idea these are closely related to the lemurs. Maybe "Enantioceti" could be like a major sub-order. I like the name. "Paracetacea" is already in use for a group of cetacean-like descendants of elephant shrews.

Metalraptor said...

Not to mention that Proletarian used Pseudocetacea for the his seal-whale creatures. I personally like the sea-monkey name, because it is sort of a pun on one of the myriad of common names for brine shrimp. But if the name must change, I would recomend a name that emphasizes their primate relationships, or their similarities to mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, or seals, since they do not look very whale-like to me. Perhaps if calling them Delphinadapids, meaning "dolphin-lemurs" and also after the type genus of the more advanced family, would make more sense.

Timgal said...

Well, if anyone else has an idea for a better common name, let me know.

Metalraptor said...

Of course, these guys are descended from tree shrews, who are not exactly primates (but then again, they're more monkey than shrew).